Parental separation and resistance to common cold

A study in which 201 healthy participants, ages 18-55, were exposed to a common cold virus found that, compared with adult participants whose parents remained together throughout the participants’ childhood, adult participants whose separated parents did not communicate during the participants’ childhood were more than three times as likely to develop a cold, whereas adult participants whose separated parents communicated during the participants’ childhood were no more likely to develop a cold. - Read at PNAS

Article #17-00610: “Offspring of parents who were separated and not speaking to one another have reduced resistance to the common cold as adults,” by Michael L. M. Murphy, Sheldon Cohen, Denise Janicki-Deverts, and William Doyle.