As a science writer, I will forever be a student of science. By writing ecological and environmental stories, I hope to inspire others to engage in scientific conversations and explore their own backyards

 

 

Hippo Droppings Drive River Food Webs

Photo Credit: amanda subalusky

Photo Credit: amanda subalusky

Hungry hippos heft grass from African savannahs to rivers

The Mara River winds its way through steep Kenyan agricultural fields, logged forests and growing towns before entering the Maasai Mara National reserve, on the border of on Tanzania. Oddly, the grasses growing in the savannas surrounding the Mara appear to be manicured.

Inside Science News Service - February 2015

Tracking Baby Sea Turtles

Photo Credit: Rebecca Scott

Photo Credit: Rebecca Scott

Nano-tags track baby sea turtles during their first few hours

Baby sea turtles vanish after they scamper into the ocean. Years later, juvenile turtles may pop up thousands of kilometers away, but often scientists don't see them again until they return to their birthplaces to nest on the beach. Now, using tiny tracking tags weighing no more than two watermelon seeds, a team has followed newborn loggerhead turtles during their first critical hours at sea, revealing how they evade predators and hitch rides on the ocean's currents.  

Mongabay.com - December 2014 ›

A Pocket of Cool Waters

Photo Credit: Snowmanradio on Flickr

Photo Credit: Snowmanradio on Flickr

Shifting winds, ocean currents doubled endangered Galapagos penguin population

Shifts in trade winds and ocean currents powered a resurgence of endangered Galapagos penguins over the past 300 years, according to a new study. These changes enlarged a cold pool of water the penguins rely on for food and breeding - an expansion that could continue as the climate changes over the coming decades, the study's authors said.

American Geophysical Union - August 2015 ›